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that the assad regime will fall by next summer. the u.s. institute posted the activists who are part of a group called the day after project. they presented a transition plan for syria which they say it started being used by the opposition areas no longer under assad's control. this is just under two hours. >> good morning ladies and gentlemen. i am jim marshall the new president of the institute of peace which i'm delighted to tell you and i'm also very pleased that everyone is here today for a very important, to hear about a very important projects sponsored by the institute of peace. my job principally is to introduce steve heideman. steve stevens or senior advisor for middle east initiatives. he has taught at columbia. he is extensively published, has also directed the center for democracy and civil studies and civil society at georgetown university. he is a terrific asset to the institute. this project is one that is driven by syria with assistance, technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute and sister institution in germany. it is very important that these kinds
artillery fighting between turkey and syria. yesterday syrian activists predict that the assad regime will fall. this was held by the u.s. institute of peace, and it is close to two hours. >> good morning. in jim marshall, the new president of the institute of peace, which i am delighted to tell you, and i am pleased everyone is here for an import -- to hear about and the port project that has been sponsored by the institute for peace. my job is to introduce steve heideman. he has directed the center for democracy and civil studies -- civil society at georgetown. he -- he is a terrific asset for the institute. this project is driven by syrians, with technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute and a sister institute in germany. it is important these efforts are driven by local populations, things that are handed down from the united states did not work all that well. we are pleased that you are here. i hope you have lots of questions, and if i can turn this over to you -- >> thank you para much, and let me add my welcome to you. we are delighted to see you her
at the moment in the middle east. there is a belief that a lot of the assad military are using weapons they've got from iran. is that true? and how long will you continue to support assad given the appalling conditions, the humanitarian catastrophe that we are all watching? at what point do you, the president of iran, say enough of this violence? >> translator: i do believe that we must all say enough of this violence right now. six months ago, i said enough of this violence. our opinion, vis-a-vis the issue of syria and other nations, is completely clear. we do believe that freedom, the right to choose, the right to vote, respect and justice is the fundamental right of all people. all people must obtain these rights. no one has the right to restrict a people and nation, but we believe as a friend of nations, we must help the nations around the world to obtain these rights through peaceful paths, through peaceful actions, and we have worked hard. i am now hard at work to organize a contact group in order to bring the two sides into a point of national agreement. >> mr. president, do you con
is a really difficult proposition. and it's a complex to society. when mr. assad goes as i believe eventually he will, what takes its place. how do we do that? these are complicated things. i don't know enough about-- when every one of these things is going on, gi out of my way not to talk to hillary about it so i don't have any information i shouldn't have so i don't inadvertently say something to you that i shouldn't say. so i don't know what their options are. but i think that if we have some nonlethal options that we could use to support the syrian opposition, i presume we would be doing it. and i wouldn't be surprised if we are. i think most people believe that assad is going to have to go. it's sooner or later he will. and their concern about whether-- whatever arrangements that succeeds him can preserve a secular state can preserve a state which gives women a commendable amount of opportunities when compared with the competition in the region, you know, and but is less oppressive, less repressive and less subject to the siren song of the iranians and hezbollah and other forces that pro
, or give us anti-aircraft weapons, the war would be over in two or three days. and so would assad's regime. you have a message for president assad? "my message is clear," he said, "surrender now. he killed our children and destroyed our homes. we will not allow him to lead syria." if nothing stops this war, the u.n. estimates that as many as 700,000 syrians will have fled to neighboring countries by the end of this year. and there is growing concern the violence could trigger further sectarian conflict, and widen a fault line in the region, already at the brink. brian? >> ann curry after a dicey day of reporting in syria today. and our thanks to our team on the ground from across the region tonight. ann curry, richard engel and lester holt. thank you all. we'll have much more of their reporting on our website tonight, nbcnightlynews.com. when our broadcast continues, emergency landings, loose seats, late flights. what's going on at american airlines these days? >>> and later a woman making a difference for young girls who don't have another home to go home to. tom costello. >> reporter: mo
the officials loyal to president bashar al-assad. they renewed it last week to gain control with aleppo. a free syrian army spokesperson says the assad regime mobilized 30,000 troops and 2,000 tanks for the battle. he says rebel fighters plan to carry out simultaneous bombing attacks on the military. >>> citizens upset by iran's plummeting currency have taken to the streets of the capital tehran. their protests highlight their growing frustration with the government. protesters fought with riot police in the city's main bazaar. they were demanding the government stop the fall of the rial. demonstrators staged another protest in a different area of the city. iran's currency has lost 70% of the value in the past year and hit record lows against the dollar. u.s. and european sanctions targeting iran are hurting the economy. anti-government protests are unusual in iran. an exchanger at the bazaar said the demonstrators were merchants. >> there have been no reports of injuries, but many shops are closed in and around the bazaar. security officers are patrolling the area. >>> japan's foreign minister
activist today predicted that the assad regime will fall by next summer. the u.s. institute of peace hosted the activist who were part of a group called the day after project. they presented a transition plan for syria which they say is being used by the opposition in areas no longer under assad's control. it's under two hours. [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, ladies and gentlemen. i'm jim marshall the new president of the substitute of peace. i'm delighted to tell you. and i'm also pleased that everyone is here today for a very important -- to hear about a important project that has been sponsored. my job is to introduce steven heydemann. steve is the senior adviser for middle east initiative. he taught at colombia. he is published and directed if the senator for democracy and civil society at georgetown university. steve is terrific asset to the institute. the project is one that it driven by syrians. with assistance technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute in a sister constitution in germany. it's very important that these kinds of efforts be driven
ambassador. it's working with the arab league to identify people to help force assad out of power a year after president obama said, we want assad out of power. he has substantive things to talk about on the debate stage when they debate foreign policy in two weeks and that ad is now irrelevant. >> don't you think this is a case of him saying, i'll do the things the president is trying to do but do them more effectively? >> there's a fair case to make and there's an opening for that. >> i agree. i'm not saying that's a bad thing. >> there's an opening the size of a pin drop. he didn't lay out his strategy for peace in israel. on iran, the best he could come up with was, i'm going to get tougher on iran because i'm going to have tougher sanctions. >> when barack obama came to office, he said, i'm not george w. bush, so therefore, i can negotiate with iran. >> he said he would open up all doors but he wasn't going to give you a seat at the table unless you wanted to come and talk peace. >> we have unsolicited advice on the other side of the break including helpful hints for donald trump. s
the hole in the middle of this is what is a post as sad, assad syria going to look at, what is the political and security order of a post assad era on? >> you has mosni on the panel you need to get egypt, iran and others aund the tab. >> it seems me he is right, basically, because all of those four countries have got a buying interest and we have interests as well, so i think we -- >> you don't mind the idea of iran being part of that and saudi arabia? >> they already are a part of it. >> they have dealt themselves in but in a negative way. >> but the united states has not bought into that idea. >> it is very difficult and if you are saying to me what is going to be the thing that in the end find a way through, i haven't yet seen a military plan that has said to me, yes this is a way of protectin ose people. and -- but the threat from the minister in my time said the definition of foreign policy is stopping people from killing each other and i am not seeing governance or intelligence i have not seen an intervention plan that could in the least bit work. >> i am not arguing e
, and children have been massacred by the assad regime over the past 20 months. violent extremists are flowing into the fight. our ally turkey has been attacked. the conflict threatens stability in the region. america can take pride in the blows that our military and intelligence professionals have inflicted on al qaeda, pakistan, afghanistan, including the killing of osama bin laden. these are real achievements one at a high cost. al qaeda remains a strong force, however, in yemen and somalia, libya, other parts of north africa, iraq, and now in syria, and other extremists have been ground across the region. drones and modern instruments of war are important tools in our fight, but are no substitute for national security strategy for the middle east. the president is fond of saying that the tide of war is receding. i want to believe him as much as anyone se. but when we look at the middle east today, with iran closer than ever to nuclear weapons capability, with the conflict in syria threatening to destabilize the region, and with a violent extremists on the march, and with an american ambass
of the opposition who share our values and ensure they obtain the arms they need to defeat assad's tanks, helicopters and fighter jets. nbc's first read pointing out that reports of cia doing something covertly like this in syria. so something going on as we speak. the u.s. government did this with libya. basically arming the opposition. and you know, your men ri's men ri is only my friend for so long. is that a wise approach? >> no. i have spent time on this issue. there's no doubt providing nonlethal communication support is extraordinary important and secretary clinton announced massive amount of humanitarian assistance and ku dos to the administration for doing that. the real problem here is that there's this struggle within the romney campaign itself over syria between neo-conservatives to militarily intervene and those who actually are more reticent and the problem is that mr. romney flip flops between one group and the other and can't quite decide which one is more important. the bottom line, however, for purposes of american interest in the middle east, arming a rag tag group of
? >> there is a whole category of rebels, the prchz to a ba shall al-assad's regime and there are some more democrat cli inclined shall we say to presumably would want to have a better relationship with the united states with the west and other friendly countries in the middle east, whether saudi arabia or qatar or some of the other countries actively involved in what's going on in syria a. the great concern the obama administration has had and the reason why the u.s. has not sought to arm the rebels is because some of those rebels may be totally opposed to the united states, maybe closer to al qaeda, for example, than to the united states, so once you start arming rebels in a major way, you're not sure where those weapons are going to wind up, and that's been the big concern of the obama administration right now. how do you make sure that the weapons you provide rebels are really going to the good guys as it were as opposed to the potential bad guys and that's not an easy question to answer. >> never. in fact, we have countless examples where this has gone awry. hold the thought for a moment. if you co
countries to help arm the rebels to defeat president bashar assad. >> and then ensure that they obtain the arms they need to defeat assad's tanks and helicopters and fighter jets. >> reporter: romney's aide saying romney is not suggesting the u.s. arm the rebels directly. president obama has opposed providing weapons to the rebels partly out of concern that those weapons could wind up in the hands of terrorists. on iran mitt romney earlier this year saying this. >> if we re-elect barack obama, iran will have a nuclear weapon. >> reporter: but today was unclear what exactly romney would do that would be different. the obama administration imposing tough sanctions already. >> i will not hesitate to impose new sanctions on iran and will tighten the sanctions we currently have. >> reporter: the obama campaign asking just what would those new sanctions be, and on libya after the attack in benghazi that killed four americans including ambassador chris stevens, blistering words today from romeny for the obama administration. >> this latest assault can't be blamed on a reprehensible video insu
to the syrian's request for freedom and he would do more to help the opposition against bashar al- assad. >> i'll work with our partners to identify and organize members of the opposition who share our whoes and then ensure that they obtain the arms they need to defeat assad's tanks and helicopters and fighter jets. >> reporter: romney also delivered his harshest assessment yet of the ministstration's evolving response to the attacks in libya. assauls latest assault can't be blamed on a reprehensible video insulting islam-- despite the heministration's attempts to convince us of that for so long. no, as the administration has finally conceded, these attacks erat the deliberate work of terrorists. they use violence to impose violr dark ideology and others. >> reporter: romney has been critical of the way the eyesident has handled libya, he iticalted humanitarian aid when ibe president advocated that but esidenhe president last year called for qaddafi's ouster, scott, romney accused him of omneng ad hoc determinations and saying he didn't have a long- term strategy. >> pelley: as you might imagi
inside their country to a conflict with turkey. jon: bashar al-assad's forces have enough of a problem just containing, just battling their own population, the rebel fighters within syria. if they have to take on a force from outside, namely turkey, are they going to be able to handle that? >> no, they could not. quite frankly, i don't think they can handle the rebels if we gave them the weapons that they desire and some of the information that they desperately need, not even to speak of a no-fly zone, if we just armed them properly i think the syrian military would have significant problems with the rebels as we've already seen. jon: but then you wind up with the question of who fills the vacuum. if bashar al-assad were to fall who fills the vacuum, and can we be certain that the rebels are going to wind up being our friends? >> well, we cannot. i don't think anybody would be able to predict that, and certainly what we've seen in egypt and also in libya tells you just how challenging this is. we do know what we have there now. we have a brutal dictatorship where people are socially, p
to see what a difference one debate has made. also, rare access into the syrian president bashar al assad's inner circle. a one-time insider sits down with cnn, admits covering up crimes and so much more. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> this just coming into "the situation room" as we await our interview with mitt romney, we have brands new poll numbers from one of the most crucial battleground states in the country certainly on the cnn electoral college map, ohio. both presidential candidates will be there today. and look at this. romney's catching up dramatically. president obama's still ahead 51% to 47%. but his four-point lead falls now within the poll's sampling error. the president had a nine-point lead in our most recent poll of polls in ohio, which was completed just before last week's presidential debate in denver. our chief national correspondent john king is joining us from the state capital of columbus right now. john, you're taking a closer look at the new numbers in this ohio poll. what are you seeing? >> reporter: wolf, if you had any doubt the first d
to president bashar al assad. the free syrian army renewed its offensive last week in an effort to win control of aleppo. government forces responded with air strikes. a free syrian army said they mobilized 30,000 troops and 2,000 tanks for the battle. rebel fighters plan to carry out more simultaneous bombing attacks on the military. >>> plummeting value of iran's currency has triggered rare street clashes in the capital tehran. the protests jai alai growing public frustration with the government. scores of protesters clashed with riot police in the city's main bazaar on wednesday. they demanded the government stop the rial's plunge. it lost 70% of the value in the last year since economic sanctions were imposed by the united states and europe over iran's nuclear program. it's dipped to record lows against the dollar. a money exchanger who witnessed the protest told nhk by phone that the demonstrators were merchants. >> there are no reports yet of injuries. many shops have closed in and around the bazaar. security officers are patrolling the area. anti-government protests are unusual in iran.
children, all of them were killed when a rocket landed on his house. >> to live is to die. bashar al-assad is a daunting task. you will die wherever you go. they say foreign aid is being provided, but we see nothing. just let us die and get it over with. >> aleppo has become the defining battle in this civil war. neither side can afford to lose, but in truth, neither is winning. what does seem to be happening is the slow, painful death of syria. >> aiding the rebels in syria was one of many issues which mitt romney touchdown during a foreign policy speech in virginia today. charging the obama administration is sitting on the sidelines, he did not offer specifics, but laid out this policy. >> in syria, i will work with our partners to organize those members of the opposition who share our values. they obtained the arms they need to defeat the tanks and helicopters and fighter jets. >> mitt romney in virginia today. for more on what he had to say and how foreign policy is playing his campaign, i am joined by our foreign policy correspondent. thank you for coming in. how would president romne
normally, but they don't necessarily support assad. >> do they believe this is going to end, and it's going to end well, or do they believe that this killing will just continue for a long period of time? >> i think people right now believe that it's going to go on, that it's going to continue, that there's no immediate end in sight. they just kind of get on -- they're sort of in the middle class who are less well off and less affected by the battles themselves. they're just trying to get on with their lives, but i think they all know that this ultimately is going to come to just a worsening situation where there's more loss of life. i think what we've seen, for example, in alleppo today with those car bombs that makes it look like the battle is turning into as we saw in iraq, and certainly some of the groups that are getting involved in the fight with -- on the rebel side using tactics that have been borrowed from al qaeda and others. that's why we're beginning to see some of those tactics. >> there are 30,000 people, perhaps more who have been killed over the course of this uprising. talk
where more than 30,000 men, women and children have been massacred by assad regime over the past 20 months. violent extremists are flowing into the fight. our ally turkey has been attacked and the conflict threatens stability in the region. america can take pride in the blows that our military and intelligence professionals have inflicted on al qaeda in pakistan and afghanistan including the kill of usama bin laden. these are real achievements won at a high cost. al qaeda remains a strong force however in yemen and somalia, in libya, and other parts of north africa, in iraq and now in syria and other extremists have gained ground across the region. drones and modern instruments of war are important tools in our fight but they are no substitute for a national security strategy for the middle east. the president is fond of saying that the tide of war is receding and i want to believe him as much as anyone else but when we look at the middle east today, with iran closer than ever to nuclear weapons capability, with the conflict in syria threatening to destablize the region and with vio
of arming the syrians, finding those syrian moderates, those pro-western rebels fighting bashar al assad, that may be a new strategy on the part of romney as opposed to the obama administration which has been totally reluctant to arm any of the rebels in syria fearing those weapons could wind up in the hands of the so-called terrorist, the bad guys, if you will. that's a clear differentiation, but i think from the american political perspective, there's no great desire to get involved militarily on the ground or in the air for that matter in syria or elsewhere. >> all right. well, thank you very much. appreciate it. of course, we're fwog bring in fareed zakaria to talk about this. fareed in new york. of course, you were watching this as well, and one of the points that you brought up is that these two leaders, these two men really see eye to eye on a lot of foreign policy issues. the only one that we really heard that was different was what you had actually talked about and that was romney's stance on arming the syrian rebels. how does the united states go about doing that, because we kn
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 110 (some duplicates have been removed)